TET VOLUME 8 NUMBER 2 NOVEMBER 2018

CONTENTS: VOLUME 8 NUMBER 2

 

LITERATURE

OUP EXAM SUCCESS ENGLISH LITERATURE STUDY GUIDES

THE MARK (Edyth Bulbring)

Events of the Shakespeare Society of Southern Africa .(from the President, Chris Thurman)

            my shakespeare – call

            Shakespeare and Social Justice

 

WRITING

English GUIDELINE FOR TEACHING AND WRITING ESSAYS AND TRANSACTIONAL TEXTS doc 4 doc 11082010

HOW-TO-TEACH-CREATIVE-WRITING  (Noelin Naidoo)

 

LANGUAGE

THE DICTIONARY AS A BASIS FOR LANGUAGE LESSONS (Linda Paxcon)

 

READING

HOW MY LIBRARY DOUBLED ITS CIRCULATION (Meghan Stigge)

 

GENERAL

BRAIN FRIENDLY TEACHING (Claudia Vosters)

ATTENTION HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH TEACHERS (Malcolm Venter

ON REFLECTION (Morag Venter)

INNOVATION FOR PRECIPITATING A REVIVAL FOR EDUCATIONAL SURVIVAL (Mark Frank)

 

 

 

 




TET VOLUME 8 NUMBER 1

    Teaching English Today

      A project of the English Academy of Southern Africa

       www.teachenglishtoday.org

 

       

Dear colleagues

We are pleased to bring you the first issue of TET for 2018.

Please note:

  • We have edited contributions but have tried to retain the flavour and style of the originals.
  • The Academy does not necessarily endorse the views expressed by individual authors.

Maritzburg College, in association with The English Academy of Southern Academy, hosted the 3rd Conference for Teachers of English on 25 May 2018. The theme for this year’s conference was The English Teacher as a Leader.

The co-ordinator of the conference was Rodelle Govender, HOD: Languages, Arts; Subject Head: English at Maritzburg College. Grateful thanks to Rodelle for encouraging presenters to make their presentations available for publication in TET – and, of course, thanks to those presenters who did so. We have included some of the presentations here and will publish further presentations in the second issue of TET later this year.

Our next issue is scheduled to go online in November 2018. We once again invite teachers, teacher trainers, departmental officials, personnel at English-related organizations and other educationists to

  1. Send in suggestions / issues that you would like to have featured.
  2. Submit articles on aspects of teaching English in schools (both practical and theoretical), teaching tips (which can be anything from 50 – 500 words), information about teaching resources, for publication. We offer an award of R400 for the best article and R250 for the best teaching tip, provided they meet our minimum criteria of accuracy, readability and value for English teachers.
  3. Give us news about related organizations and advertisements for courses, seminars, etc. These we will publish free of charge.

You are also welcome to send us articles on English teaching which you have come across which we could share with others.

Please send these at any time – but not later than 15 October 2018 – to the Editor at drv@worldonline.co.za.

Best wishes
(Dr) Malcolm Venter: Editor

July 2018

SCROLL DOWN FOR THIS ISSUE OF TET …

 

TET VOLOUME 8 NUMBER 1: JULY 2018

 

SHAKESPEARE TODAY

Why Shakespeare should not be taught in South Africa – Chris Thurman, Wits University

Shakespeare – not on age, but for all time – Betty Govinden

SHAKESPEARE ZA

       Shakespeare ZA questionnaire

       SSOSA Youth (Schools) Application Form

 

POETRY

Teaching Poetry – Noelin Naidoo: HOD, Alexandra High School

Notes on Grade 12 HL poems (1) – J Singh: SES English Home Language

Notes on Grade 12 HL poems (2) – Noelin Naidoo

Notes on Grade 12 HL poems (3) – Noelin Naidoo

 

NOVELS

 Mother to Mother (Grade 10) – Alen Zimunya: Carter High School

 

LANGUAGE

A Case for the English Language Textbook – Mark Frank: South Peninsula High School

 

GENERAL

Like a pebble…– Bulara Manyaki

The role of mentoring from a leadership perspective – Chris Luman




TET VOLUME 7 NUMBER 2



Teaching English Today

A project of the English Academy of Southern Africa

www.teachenglishtoday.org

 

Dear colleagues

We are pleased to bring you the second issue of TET for 2017.

Please note:

  • We have edited contributions but have tried to retain the flavour and style of the originals.
  • The Academy does not necessarily endorse the views expressed by individual authors.

Many thanks to those who responded to our call for contributions.

Our next issue is scheduled to go online in April 2018. We once again invite teachers, teacher trainers, departmental officials, personnel at English-related organizations and other educationists to

  1. Send in suggestions / issues that you would like to have featured.
  2. Submit articles on aspects of teaching English in schools (both practical and theoretical), teaching tips (which can be anything from 50 – 500 words), information about teaching resources, for publication. We offer an award of R400 for the best article and R250 for the best teaching tip, provided they meet our minimum criteria of accuracy, readability and value for English teachers.
  3. Give us news about related organizations and advertisements for courses, seminars, etc. These we will publish free of charge.

We will consider a ‘prize’ of R400 for the best article / teaching tip if it meets the minimum criteria of good value for teachers and readability. (Congratulations to Bernice Borain of Maritzburg College for her note on teaching Tsotsi.)

You are also welcome to send us articles on English teaching which you have come across which we could share with others.

Please send these at any time – but not later than 20 March 2018 – to the Editor at drv@worldonline.co.za.

Best wishes
(Dr) Malcolm Venter: Editor

April 2017        

 

SCROLL DOWN FOR THIS ISSUE OF TET and click on the titles.

 

LITERATURE

IS SHAKESPEARE IRRELEVANT TO SCHOOLS

Five Reasons Why We Need Poetry in Schools

QUESTIONS ON THE ZULU GIRL

NOTES ON THE POEM FIRST DAY AFTER THE WAR

TOTSI THE NOVEL (Power Point)

CONTEXTUAL QUESTION ON HAMLET

 

LANGUAGE

FORMAL AND INFORMAL ENGLISH

 

 

WRITING

Filmmaking as a Guided English composition

 

READING

Four Teaching Moves That Promote A Growth Mindset In All Readers

 

GENERAL

How NOT to decolonize

DO THE CAPS CAP IT

CONTRIBUTIONS TO ENGLISH ALIVE

 

 

 

 

 




TET VOLUME 7 NUMBER 1

Teaching English Today

A project of the English Academy of Southern Africa

www.teachenglishtoday.org

Dear colleagues

We are pleased to bring you the first issue of TET for 2017.

Please note:

  • We have edited contributions but have tried to retain the flavor and style of the originals.
  • The Academy does not necessarily endorse the views expressed by individual authors.

Many thanks to those who responded to our call for contributions.

Our next issue is scheduled to go online in October2017. We once again invite teachers, teacher trainers, departmental officials, personnel at English-related organizations and other educationists to

  1. Send in suggestions / issues that you would like to have featured.
  2. Submit articles on aspects of teaching English in schools (both practical and theoretical), teaching tips (which can be anything from 50 – 500 words), information about teaching resources, for publication. We offer an award of R400 for the best article and R250 for the best teaching tip, provided they meet our minimum criteria of accuracy, readability and value for English teachers.
  3. Give us news about related organizations and advertisements for courses, seminars, etc. These we will publish free of charge.

We will consider a ‘prize’ of R400 for the best article / teaching tip if it meets the minimum criteria of good value for teachers and readability. (Congratulations to Sue McIntosh, who will receive the reward for her articles on Tsotsi in the current issue of TET.)

You are also welcome to send us articles on English teaching which you have come across which we could share with others.

Please send these at any time – but not later than 26 September 2017 – to the Editor at drv@worldonline.co.za.

Best wishes
(Dr) Malcolm Venter: Editor

April 2017        

To locate the latest issue of TET:

  1. Go to the website (www.teachenglishtoday.org).
  2. Find ‘Recent posts’ top left of the website.
  3. Click on ‘TET VOLUME 7 NUMBER 1’ below this.
  4. Scroll down to find the articles.

 

LITERATURE

BRIDESHEAD REVISITED

FUGARD TRANSFORMS ART INTO LIVED REALITY – TEACHING TOTSI TO GRADE 11s

BACKGROUND ON TSOTSI

SAMPLE QUESTIONS FOR TESTS AND EXAMS Tsotsi (3)

TEACHING NOTES ON CRY, THE BELOVED COUNTRY

How to teach The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.docx

THE CRUCIBLE.docx

Teachers Shake Up Shakespeare with Digital Media

Shakespeare in South African schools

Kids Feel the Power of Poetry in Performance

Notes on REMEMBER by Don Mattera

 

LANGUAGE

AN INFORMAL NOTE ON GRAMMATICAL CONCORD

WHAT IS CORRECT ENGLISH

 

READING

TWO ARTICLES ON READING

 

 

 

 

 




TET VOLUME 6 NUMBER 2

Teaching English Today

A project of the English Academy of Southern Africa

www.teachenglishtoday.org

Dear colleagues

We are pleased to bring you the second issue of TET for 2016.

Please note:

  • We have edited contributions but have tried to retain the flavor and style of the originals.
  • The Academy does not necessarily endorse the views expressed by individual authors.

Many thanks to those who responded to our call for contributions.

Our next issue is scheduled to go online in April 2017. We once again invite teachers, teacher trainers, departmental officials, personnel at English-related organizations and other educationists to

  1. Send in suggestions / issues that you would like to have featured.
  2. Submit articles on aspects of teaching English in schools (both practical and theoretical), teaching tips (which can be anything from 50 – 500 words), information about teaching resources, for publication. We offer an award of R400 for the best article and R250 for the best teaching tip, provided they meet our minimum criteria of accuracy, readability and value for English teachers.
  3. Give us news about related organizations and advertisements for courses, seminars, etc. These we will publish free of charge.

We will consider a ‘prize’ of R400 for the best article / teaching tip if it meets the minimum criteria of good value for teachers and readability.

You are also welcome to send us articles on English teaching which you have come across which we could share with others.

Please send these at any time – but not later than 31 March 2017 – to the Editor at drv@worldonline.co.za.

Best wishes
(Dr) Malcolm Venter

Editor

November 2016 

                                   

SCROLL DOWN TO FIND THE ARTICLES.

Each time click on the PDF (nderlined) title of the article.  Then click on the reverse button (top left) to return to the index.

 

ENGLISH ALIVE:  An anthology of high school writing

how-to-use-english-alive-50-in-the-classroom

calling-for-submissions-to-english-alive-2017

 

DID YOU KNOW?

dictionary-of-south-african-english-on-historical-principles-now-available-online

new-book-on-south-african-english

english-fal-website

 

READING AND WRITING

reading-essential-for-learnng-how-to-write

art-of-essay-writing-damaged-by-twitter-and-facebook

 

TEACHING NOTES

The Picture of Dorian Gray:

teaching-notes-on-the-picture-of-dorian-gray teaching-notes-on-the-picture-of-dorian-gray

 

The life of Pi:

teaching-notes-on-the-life-of-pi

worksheet-on-the-life-of-pi

Hamlet:

contextual-questions-on-hamlet

Macbeth:

teaching-notes-on-macbeth

 

TEACHING TIP

teaching-english-via-empathy

 

DISCUSSION ISSUES

the-ripple-effect-approach

demythologising-school-exams-saheti-article-for-business-day-2016

shakespeare-must-fall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




TET IS BACK!

Happy birthday to the Bard on 23 April!

 

TEACHING ENGLISH TODAY RE-LAUNCHED

Read more:

Click on 'Volume 6 of TET launched' below:

Volume 6 of TET launched

 

INDEX: TEACHING ENGLISH TODAY April 2016

(Articles appear below the Index.)

 

LITERATURE:

guy butler

  Themes  

   in Hamlet                                                  

      – Guy Butler

hamlet small

   Teaching image patterns

    in Hamlet                        

       – Hilary Semple

hamlet-320x203      

     Essay questions on Hamlet                

get_thee_to_a_nunnery___hamlet_by_marikorose-d399i91  

   Contextual question on Hamlet

Lord of the Flies  (1) Contextual question on

         Lord of the Flies

  (2) A comment on

         Lord of the Flies                             

                                                    –  Jean Shannon

plays

    A play in day                                                

            – Helen Lockyear

shakespeare  

   Resources for

   teaching Shakespeare

totsi

          (1) Teaching Tsotsi 

          (2)  Discussion questions on Tstosi                                           

unseen poetry   Unseen poem for Grade 12

   

WRITING:

writing skills    Improving

    writing skills                                      

      – Jeffrey Solomon

 

 

LANGUAGE:

tenses in english

   Teaching verb tenses   

    (with Power Point presentation)                                        

     – Sue Macintosh

texting    Duz txting

    hurt yr kidz gramr?

figures of speech    A rough note on teaching

    figures of speech  

    (with Power Point presentation)    

                                                           – Malcolm Venter

teaching english   Critical awareness of teaching English today       

          – Bully Monyaki

teaching-tips (1) Teaching Tip: Dealing with

      vocabulary

(2) Teaching Tip: Hot off the press –

      using bill boards 

                                                           – Andrew Graaf

barbara hathorn   English at Once

    worksheets                                   

         – Barbara Hathorn

         

GENERAL:

english resources  Resources for

  FAL English teachers

error  The language of learning

   and teaching            

         – Anne Peltason

anne condy  Being human

  today                                           

       – Anne Condy

teachers     Why so little about   

     teachers?                            

                  – Laurence Wright

ROBIN MALAN    Non-academic

   or C-stream English                    

           – Robin Malan

SCROLL DOWN TO FIND THE ARTICLES … CLICK ON THE LINKS. (Use the reverse arrow on your computer to return to the list.)

Themes in Hamlet

Teaching image patterns in Hamlet

Essay questions on Hamlet

Contextual questions on Hamlet

Contextual question on Lord of the Flies

A Play in a Day

Resources for teaching Shakespeare

Teaching Tsotsi

Discussion Questions on Tsoti

Unseen poem for Grade 12

Teaching Verb Tenses

  Teaching Verb tenses Power Point

Duz Txting Hurt Yr Kidz Gramr?

A rough note on teaching figures of speech

  A rough note on teaching figures of speech Power Point

Critical language awareness for English today

Teaching Tip – Dealing with vocabulary

Teaching Tip – Hot off the press – Using bill boards

ENGLISH AT ONCE WORKSHEETS

Once 2016 Jan 27 SP worksheet 1 Bavuma

Once 2016 Jan 27 SP worksheet 1 TEXT Bavuma

Resources for FAL teachers

The language of learning and teaching

Being human today

Why so little about teachers

Non-academic or C-stream English

 

 

 

 

 




Welcome to the Summer 2012 Edition of TET

Welcome to the 2012 summer editon of

Teaching English Today

 

 

We trust that you will find the articles that follow interesting, challenging and useful.

Please feel free to respond to / add to / challenge any of the views expressed in the articles.

And please do send us your contribution for the next issue (due November 2012).  Send these to the Editor at drv@worldonline.co.za and maybe you could win a copy of The Longman South Africa School Dictionary. 

 

Kind regards

(Dr) Malcolm Venter

EDITOR

 

Longman Dictionaries

Longman dictionaries have played a significant role in the development, analysis and teaching of English since

1755. Longman has a comprehensive list of dictionaries available for Grades 4 to 12.

 Longman South African School Dictionary plus CD-ROM Suitable for Grades 4 – 9

The interactive CD-ROM allows learners to:

  •      Look up the full contents of the dictionary
  •      Listen to the pronunciation of all the words
  •      Record themselves to check their pronunciation
  •      Practise spelling, vocabulary and grammar in the Language Trainer
  •      PLUS: Photo dictionary and video clips to enhance understanding

9781408202630 Longman South African School Dictionary with CD-ROM

 




Teaching English punctuation

Teaching English Punctuation

 

Sue McIntosh

 

Some of you can identify with the interesting challenge of teaching the intricacies of the English language to a large class of varying home languages. Teaching some of these language concepts piecemeal, as presented in the textbooks, provides our learners with one or two concepts out of a broad area of grammatical skills, which they find difficult to implement in their writing. The new textbooks are no better than the previous ones in this regard. Here we are, looking for help with the basic writing skills.

 

Because of this, I have developed a series of PowerPoint presentations for use in a classroom with learners speaking up to 10 different home languages (none of them English) or for a largely English-speaking private school classroom or for the small group at tertiary level. They are specifically geared to teaching language in holistic sections. By this I mean explaining all the rules systematically and applying them to the writing of English; not merely the answering of language questions which are found in the final section of Paper 1: USING LANGUAGE CORRECTLY. The presentations make use of visual stimuli, video clips, creative tasks and games.

One of the presentations which would be useful to teachers of grades 10 to 12 is focused on punctuation. [Click on the link at the end to download the PP presentation.] A major challenge for learners who normally use SMS and BBM language is learning to punctuate their writing correctly. It is possible to teach punctuation in the classroom using short, rule-based slides, followed by a writing activity or a game to facilitate active learning. Where there is no data projector available, a hard copy of six slides per page may be printed and the learner may be encouraged to take notes and answer exercises on the page. Learners with laptops in the classroom can use a soft copy of the PowerPoint on which they can make notes and complete the exercises.

It is recommended that this grammar presentation be used at Grade 10 level, in Term 1. Teaching this at the beginning of the year provides a basis for correcting errors and enables revision at later points during the year. This presentation has also been used successfully at tertiary level for language support in small groups.

Once you have perused the presentation, you may wish to adapt it to make it more applicable to your learners. While learners are completing the exercises, move around and assist them. Many learners have never written a sentence with a colon or semi-colon, and they find Exercises 2 and 3 particularly difficult.

 

CLICK BELOW FOR POWERPOINT PRESENTATION.

 Punctuation

 

    Sue McIntosh has been teaching and lecturing English for 28 years at high schools, tertiary colleges and

    universities. She was educated at the University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban (BA (Hons), HDE, Masters in South

    African Literature. She is currently the English Subject Head at Bloubergrant Secondary School on the Western

    Seaboard of Cape Town. Last year she set the North Metropole Preparatory Exam Paper 1 for Grade 12 in

    September. She is also a marker for Paper 2 Grade 12 Final Examinations.




The very model of an amateur grammarian

The very model of

an amateur grammarian

(With apologies to Gilbert and Sullivan)

 

I am the very model of an amateur grammarian
I have a little knowledge and I am authoritarian
But I make no apology for being doctrinarian
We must not plummet to the verbal depths of the barbarian

I’d sooner break my heart in two than sunder an infinitive
And I’d disown my closest family within a minute if
They dared to place a preposition at a sentence terminus
Or sully the Queen’s English with neologisms verminous

I know that ‘soon’ and not ‘right now’ is the true sense of ‘presently’
I’m happy to correct you and I do it oh so pleasantly
I’m not a grammar Nazi; I’m just a linguistic Aryan
I am the very model of an amateur grammarian

I’m sure people appreciate my pointing out their grammar gaffes
And sorting out their sentences and crossing out their paragraphs
When you crusade for good English, it’s not all doom and gloom you sow
The secret of success is: it’s not who you know; it’s whom you know

The standards of our language are declining almost every day
Down from a peak in 18– or 19– I think – well, anyway
Pop music, TV, blogs and texting are inflicting ravages
Upon English and unchecked, this will turn us into savages

I fear that sloppy language is a sign of immorality
For breaking rules of grammar is akin to criminality
So curse those trendy linguists, lexicographers and anyone
Who shuns the model English of the amateur grammarian

Conjunctions at the openings of sentences are sickening
I wish that the decline of the subjunctive were not quickening
And that more people knew the proper meaning of ‘anticipate’
Of ‘fulsome’ and ‘enormity’, ‘fortuitous’ and ‘decimate’

I learned these rules at school and of correctness they’re my surety
I cling to them for safety despite having reached maturity
Some say that language changes, but good English is immutable
And so much common usage now is deeply disreputable

My pedantry’s demanding but I try not to feel bitter at
The fact that everyone I meet is borderline illiterate
When all around are wrong then I am proud to be contrarian
I am the very model of an amateur grammarian

Souce: http://stroppyeditor.wordpress.com/




Ill-disciplined teachers: The training of English teachers

Ill-discipline teachers

Or

Where ignorance is not bliss

 

Malcolm Venter

 

I have for many years been concerned about the inadequate training of language teachers – or more particularly English language teachers, which is my field of interest. This has struck me again forcefully in the past two or three years for a number of reasons.

Firstly, I have been observing student-teachers who have at least English II, mostly English III, and are busy with their post-graduate diplomas or the last year of their BEd. Their inadequate knowledge – either because they have no knowledge or because they have superficial half-knowledge (which is worse) – is patent in the lessons they present. Here are just a few examples from lessons I have recently observed on figures of speech:

  • They have no idea of what a figurative comparison is, as opposed to a literal comparison. Thus they will accept an example such as He is like Bill Gates or He is as rich as Bill Gates as a simile. The fact that figurative comparisons are based on similarities between different classes of things simply eludes them.
  • Metaphors are presented as straight alternatives to similes – comparisons without ‘like’ or ‘as’ (e.g. He is a pig vs He is like a pig). So far so good – but not far enough. What about metaphors that are expressed as verbs (e.g. He barked at me)?  In fact, one student who had just taught the difference between similes and metaphors without mentioning that metaphors can also be verbs, went on to teach a poem where the only metaphor was a verb – we iron out our differences. Not surprising that the pupils did not pick up that it was a metaphor.
  • Tautology is presented as mere repetition – e.g. He is a huge, big man. The fact that tautology always involves using a word later in a text whose meaning is part of the meaning of an earlier word (not repetition as such) is not understood. For example: He returned back (where ‘returned’ means ‘went back’).
  • An example of an oxymoron given by two students was pretty ugly. Neither understood that in this context ‘pretty’ has nothing to do with looks but is an informal modifier meaning ‘to a moderate degree; fairly’ (Concise Oxford).

 

The same semi-knowledge phenomenon occurs when students teach word classes. Thus, for example, they will define a pronoun as ‘a word which replaces a noun’ – which does not account for a pronoun replacing a noun phrase. For example: The old man  = He. In terms of their limited definition, one should then say The old he.

Secondly, I noted the same ignorance when I reviewed the early drafts of the new CAPS for English. I could not believe the nonsense which was included – both in terms of blatantly wrong information (e.g. ‘concord’ was defined as a ‘tense’) and the proposed teaching programme – e.g. teaching adverbs before teaching verbs.

Thirdly, I recently paged through an English language textbook which had been approved by the DBE for the new CAPS. Here are but a few of the errors I noticed in passing:

  • An adverb is defined as a ‘complement’. Certain adverbs (in particular, adverbs of place) may indeed function as a complement in a sentence such as He was there when it happened, but this is not the case with other types of adverbs.
  • A complex sentence is described as a sentence which ‘is made up of a simple sentence and a clause that cannot stand on its own as a sentence’. Once a simple sentence has been combined with another simple sentence, each of the original simple sentences is now defined as a ‘clause’. By definition, a ‘simple sentence’ is an independent structure.
  • Employer and employee are given as examples of antonyms. Pairs such as these – compare husband; wife; emigrant; immigrant – are not opposite in meaning as are pairs such as good, bad; pretty, ugly.

Why should this be the case? Why this ignorance? I think there are two main reasons:

  • The tertiary curriculum: The vast majority if English teachers do a degree in English which consists purely of literature study. They are therefore not qualified to teach the language aspects of English. This is a strange situation – one would not regard a student who had studied Chemistry but not Physics as being adequately trained to teach Physical Science.
  • The school curriculum: The curriculum has, for many years, sidelined the teaching of grammar; and the new CAPS exacerbates this situation – it practically outlaws dedicated language lessons and in its final draft abolished the language paper (which was reinstated – after a lot of fuss  – into the final version). The result is that teachers, already reluctant to teach grammar (and other language aspects) because of their feeling of insecurity in teaching something they are not masters of, do not feel the need to teach this because the curriculum plays it down.

The result of all to this is that most  English teachers have to fly by the seat of their pants when they teach the language aspects of the curriculum, using the inadequate knowledge half-remembered from their school days when they were taught by teachers who, like themselves, were only half-trained and who neglected these aspects; and so the situation perpetuates itself.

So what’s the answer? It is clear that the DBE needs to set criteria for teacher qualifications which include the language aspect, thus forcing all universities to extend their English degree courses beyond the literature level if they wish to retain students who are planning to become English teachers.

 

 

    Dr Malcolm Venter is a retired English teacher and principal and the co-author of a number of English

    langauge textbooks,  He is National Chairperson of the South African English Council and a member of the

    Executive Committee of the English Academy of Southern Africa. He received the English Academy’s Gold

    Medal Award for distinguished services to English in 2002. He is currently the editor of  Teaching English     

                                   Today.